Emperor mentors The BRIT School

Posted in News on 30 August 2017 By Sarah Eklund, Marketing Manager

Emperor’s London design team recently worked with the renowned BRIT School to mentor their students on a live brief.

A group of students on The BRIT School’s Visual Arts and Design foundation course (VAD) were assigned the brief of rebranding and creating a promotional campaign for the very course they were studying, giving them the unique opportunity to take ownership of the brand and help raise the profile of the course inside and outside the BRIT School. They met with the creatives at Emperor, who helped them to break down the brief, understand the key deliverables and develop their concepts into fleshed-out designs.

...practical industry experience - an element that is often missing from foundation courses.

Ian Carr, Course Director of The BRIT School’s Visual Arts and Design course comments: “By embarking on a mentoring programme with Emperor, our students are benefiting not only from an experienced design team’s expertise, but also from practical industry experience – an element that is often missing from foundation courses.” 

We’re proud of our investment in youth...

Marc Jenks, Executive Creative Director at Emperor shares his thoughts: “We believe it’s important to support young, emerging talent by giving them guidance and sharing the insights we’ve gained from our many years of brand communications expertise. As an agency, we’re proud of our investment in youth, with 22 of our current colleagues starting their careers with us via internships or work experience.”

The mentoring programme kicked off in June with five face-to-face sessions at Emperor and The BRIT School. The students’ work will be taken into consideration for further development and the chance to be used in future branding, online campaigns and for events.

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